F.A.Q.s

Frequently Asked Questions on Refrigerants:

General Questions (23)

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Refrigerant is a non-flammable gas that is used in almost every air-conditioning unit in the world. Rather it be cars, trucks, refrigerators, your home AC unit, even grocery store freezers use it. Want to keep something cool? Then you need Refrigerant! It’s been around for almost a hundred years now and it’s here to stay! […]

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There are numerous places you can purchase refrigerant either through online websites, in a retail setting, or purchased directly from a refrigerant distributor. Where to buy is going to be determined off of what kind of refrigerant you are looking for and what kind of quantity you are looking at. If you’re looking at just […]

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HFO refrigerants, or Hydrofluro-Olefins, are a new class of refrigerants that have a much lessened global warming potential than it’s HCFC alternatives. One example being the 134a alternative, 1234YF, which is 335 times lower on the global warming potential scale and only four times higher than standard carbon dioxide. HFOs are the refrigerant of the […]

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Before I answer this question you should know that your air conditioning unit is a closed and sealed system. The refrigerant that is in your AC system recycles itself through all of the various cycles that it goes through. The refrigerant should never run out and you should never have to refill your system unless there […]

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It depends on what type of refrigerant you are looking at. The CFCs and HCFC classes of refrigerants were phased out due to the Chlorine that they contained. It was found in the 1970s that Chlorine when released into the atmosphere causes damage to the O-Zone layer. The O-Zone layer is a type of shield […]

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Short answer, yes… but it really depends on what type of refrigerant you will be brining into the country. There are some types of Refrigerant that are monitored and only allowed a certain amount of imports per year. These types include R-12 and R-22 as well as any other CFC or HCFC classes. If you […]

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R-744, also known as CO2, is a natural refrigerant that can be traced all the way back to the 1850s. It began to see widespread usage in the early 1900s and 1920s but eventually declined due to the Great Depression and due to the high pressure that R744 operates under. In recent years it has […]

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R-452A is a new HFO refrigerant developed by DuPont that is designed to be a drop in replacement for R-404A. It is also known under DuPont’s brand name Opteon XP44. It is a more environmentally friendly refrigerant compared to it’s 404A equivalent. 404A has a global warming potential of 3,943 whereas the 452A has a […]

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Refrigerant is  hazardous and can be flammable depending on the type you are dealing with. The  storage of Refrigerant should be taken seriously and with consideration. No matter what type of refrigerant you are dealing with  you need to take the proper steps and precautions. Below are a few instrumental points to review when storing […]

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There are numerous scales on the market today and most will be able to take thirty pound cylinders or tanks. I would recommend browsing through some of the scales available through our Amazon partner as seen below. The FJC 2850 Electronic Scale shown below is one of the highest rated scales on Amazon and it is […]

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The Environmental Protection Agency’s new SNAP program is acronym for ‘The Significant New Alternative Policy.’ It’s original purpose was to monitor, regulate, and to eventually phase out O-Zone depleting gases such as R-12 and R-22. R-12 was phased out in 1994 and R-22 was phased out in 2010. The SNAP program is now being used […]

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The Kigali agreement or amendment was a treaty signed by over one-hundred and seventy countries in October of 2016 in Kigali, Rwanda. The agreement was an amendment to the already existing Montreal Protocol. The goal of this amendment was to phase out HFC refrigerants such as R-410A, R-134a, and R-404A from the world by the […]

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No, refrigerant will not go bad. As long as you have a fully sealed cylinder and there are no leaks on the cylinder you refrigerant will last indefinitely. The only risk that you have is if your cylinder or valve gets compromised. Other than that your cylinder is a sealed unit and will not deplete […]

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The rule of thumb is two to four pounds of refrigerant per ton of your machine. Most home air conditioning units are between one ton and five tons. So, with that in mind if you have a three ton unit then you would need between six pounds of refrigerant upwards to twelve pounds of refrigerant. […]

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The rule of thumb is two to four pounds of refrigerant per ton of your air conditioning unit. Now most home air conditioning units are between one ton and five tons. Anything over five tons or greater is considered a commercial unit. Let’s say you have a two ton home unit. If we do the […]

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The Refrigerant Sales Restriction is a Federal Law enforced under the Environmental Protection Agency. The law states that CFC and HCFC refrigerants can only be sold to EPA certified personnel. Those who are not certified cannot legally buy, handle, or use these refrigerants. The restriction was put in place due to the O-Zone damaging Chlorine […]

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Stop! If your unit is running low in refrigerant there is another problem. The refrigerant that is used in your system is done so through a closed system. The refrigerant cycles back and forth between liquid and gas in a continuous loop. You should never run out of refrigerant. If your system is running low […]

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You can store refrigerants for as long as you would like. The gas will not go bad as long as there is not a leak in your cylinder. If your cylinder is completely sealed you can hold onto your refrigerant for years without any worry. There are many people who still have a hold of […]

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POE Oil, or Poly Olester Oil, is a synthetic oil that is used in refrigeration compressors and the refrigeration system with Hydroflurocarbon refrigerants. These oils really became popular with the debut of R-410A refrigerant about ten years ago. But it can be used with other refrigerants such as R-22. Just do not mix mineral oil […]

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There are many kinds of refrigerant and or Refrigerant on the market today, but only a few that are widely used: R-134a refrigerant is primarily used in automobile applications. It is classified as an HFC refrigerant and has been banned in some countries due to it’s global warming potential. R-12 was THE refrigerant back in […]

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There are many types of refrigerant available and it can be rather confusing as to what type of Refrigerant your home HVAC or your vehicle takes. There are four major kinds of refrigerant today. You have your R-410A and your R-22 for your home/commercial units. You also have your R-134A and your R-12 refrigerants for […]

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There are hundreds of types of refrigerant that have been developed over the years. You can follow this link to Wikipedia for a complete listing. The list may seem daunting, but there are really only a few types of freon that are widely used in the market today.

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Refrigerant is a hazardous gas and storage of Refrigerant should not be taken lightly. No matter if you have R-134A, R-410A, R-22, or any other kind of Refrigerant you need to take the proper steps and precautions. Below are a few key points to remember when storing your Refrigerant: Ensure that all your cylinders be […]

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EPA Certification (5)

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Yes, R-502 is a CFC refrigerant and was phased out in the 1990s due to it’s effect on the O-Zone layer. In order to purchase R-502 you need to be 608 certified with the Environmental Protection Agency. You can read more about certification by clicking this link. R-502 is banned across most of the world […]

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No. You cannot purchase R-22 refrigerant if you are only certified under 609. You will need to have a valid 608 certification as well in order to legally purchase or handle R-22 refrigerant. 609 certification only covers automotive air conditioning units. If the vehicle you are working on either has a secondary cooling unit or […]

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The Refrigerant Sales Restriction is a Federal Law enforced under the Environmental Protection Agency. The law states that CFC and HCFC refrigerants can only be sold to EPA certified personnel. Those who are not certified cannot legally buy, handle, or use these refrigerants. The restriction was put in place due to the O-Zone damaging Chlorine […]

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Unfortunately, no.  609 certification is only meant for automotive applications. You are authorized to handle R-12 and R-134a, but anything else that is not directly correlated to your automotive cab you are not authorized to handle. Examples of this include refrigerated cargo or other secondary refrigeration systems in your van or truck. Another example would […]

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Yes, as long as you are only buying HFC refrigerants. Thankfully, HFCs include some of the most popular types of Refrigerant. HFCs include R-410A, R-134A, and R-404A. Any newer home HVAC unit is going to be using R-410A Refrigerant (2010 or newer.) and any automotive vehicle in the last ten years will be using R-134A. […]

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R-134a (7)

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I would not recommend it. You should be using the pag oil that is referenced by your compressor’s manufacturer. These manufacturers test varying types of oil and choose the one that best protects their individual design. Each compressor and or manufacturer may recommend a different variant of pag oil and by following their instructions you […]

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R-134a was already phased out in the European Union a few years ago and it was just announced in July 2015 that it will be phased out in the United States as well. The phase out date of R-134a in the United States is the year 2020, or on 2021 vehicle model years. I did a […]

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PAG oil, or Polyalkylene Glycol, is a fully synthetic hygroscopic oil specifically designed for automotive air conditioner compressors. It is used in R-134a air conditioning systems to lubricate the compressor. When looking at PAG oil you will notice various numbers such as PAG46 or PAG100. These numbers refer to the viscosity of the oil, similar to […]

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As of June, 2015 no you do not. R-134a is an HFC refrigerant and does NOT contain Chlorine so it does not fall under the EPA’s Refrigerant Sales Restriction. This may change in the future. R-134a does not contain Chlorine but it does have an extremely high Global Warming Potential, or GWP. The high GWP of […]

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In July 2015 the Environmental Protection Agency announced that the United State would be phasing out 134a across the country. The date that was picked was the year 2020 for total phase out in new vehicles. (2021 model year.) There was one exception made for vehicles being exported out of the country. Exported vehicles will have […]

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R-134a is the default refrigerant for all automotive applications. If you own a  car between 1994 and 2015 chances are that it takes R-134a. 134a is classified as an HFC refrigerant and does not contain Chlorine. Just as R-22 was phased out residential and commercial units R-12 was phased out of the automotive market. R-134A […]

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Yes! With past refrigerants such as R-12 and R-22 you needed to be licensed to handle the refrigerant as they caused damage to the O-Zone layer and a laymen could inadvertently cause a leak of the cylinder. R-134A, R-404A, and R-410A are HFC refrigerants which do NOT cause damage to the O-Zone layer but they […]

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R-404A (5)

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Yes, it is. The Environmental Protection Agency just announced in July of 2015 that R-404A will begin being phased out across the country. Like most phase outs this will occur in phases over the course of many years. The EPA has listed R-404a as unacceptable in newly manufactured machines for the years 2017 and 2019 […]

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As of 2015 no, but that may change. 404A is an HFC refrigerant and does not harm the O-Zone layer so therefore you do not need to have any kind of certification to purchase. However, HFC refrigerants are slowly being phased out due to their high global warming potential. Nothing official has been declared yet […]

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There are numerous places to purchase R404A refrigerant but before you start digging into which vendor to use and which pricing to look for you need to ask yourself one question. How many cylinders am I looking to purchase? If you’re looking to purchase just one or two cylinders then I would recommend you shop […]

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R-404A Refrigerant or R404/R404A Refrigerant is a mixture of chemicals similar to other HFCs such as R-410A or R-134A. R-404A isn’t as popular as the 410A or the 134A it’s main applications are for refrigerated trucks, grocery store freezers, and ice machines. It’s main purpose is to serve as a replacement for R-22 and R-502 […]

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Yes! With past refrigerants such as R-12 and R-22 you needed to be licensed to handle the refrigerant as they caused damage to the O-Zone layer and a laymen could inadvertently cause a leak of the cylinder. R-134A, R-404A, and R-410A are HFC refrigerants which do NOT cause damage to the O-Zone layer but they […]

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R-410A (4)

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There are numerous places to purchase R410a refrigerant online or through distributors. Before you consider purchasing and start looking at all of the available sources it is best to ask yourself one question: How many cylinders of R-410A am I going to purchase? If you are just looking to purchase one to two cylinders at […]

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R-410A refrigerant was invented and patented by Honeywell in 1991. Carrier Corporation was the first company to introduce R-410A air conditioning unit the residential market in 1996 and they hold the trademark name ‘Puron.’ 410A is classified as an HFC refrigerant and does not contain Chlorine and is not harmful to the O-Zone. R-410A replaced […]

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Yes! With past refrigerants such as R-12 and R-22 you needed to be licensed to handle the refrigerant as they caused damage to the O-Zone layer and a laymen could inadvertently cause a leak of the cylinder. R-134A, R-404A, and R-410A are HFC refrigerants which do NOT cause damage to the O-Zone layer but they […]

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Yes. Because of the higher pressure, you should use manifold gauge sets designed for R-410A. In addition, you should use a recovery machine and recovery tanks designed for the higher pressure of R-410A.

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1234YF (2)

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1234YF is still new to the market in the United States. Not only is it difficult to find but it is also much higher priced than traditional R-134a refrigerant. If you are looking to purchase 1234YF please contact me below and I will get with some of my distributors and have them get back to […]

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HFO-1234YF is one of the new class of refrigerants known as HFOs. HFOs are designed to replace the HCFCs that are in current use today. 1234YF is the replacement product for the most commonly used refrigerant in automotive applications known as R-134a. 134a is being replaced due to it’s high global warming potential of 1,320. […]

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R-12 (2)

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R12 is difficult to find now a days. It was phased out all the way back in 1994 and was replaced with R-134a. There are very few places where you can actively buy R-12 today. Before you consider purchasing R-12 you should ask yourself one question: “How many cylinders or cans am I looking to purchase?” […]

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R-12 Refrigerant is the original Refrigerant. At one point in time it was used for everything including home air conditioning units, automobiles, and refrigerators. It was invented by a partnership of DuPont and General Motors back in the 1920s and was being used as the primary type of Refrigerant for home units until the 1950s. […]

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R-22 (5)

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R-22a is a different name for the hydrocarbon refrigerant known as R-290. (Propane) R-290 has seen widespread usage throughout the world except in the United States. Earlier this year (2015) the EPA approved Propane to be used in NEW machines manufactured this year. I empathize new as there have been instances of companies marketing R-22a […]

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R-22 Refrigerant is a little difficult to find now a days. Since R-22 is a CFC refrigerant it has been slowly phased out over the past few years and will be phased out completely around 2020. If you are looking to purchase R-22 you need to ask yourself one question: “How many cylinders am I […]

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Yes, you will need to be EPA 608 certified in order to handle or purchase R-22 Refrigerant/Refrigerant. R-22 is an HCFC refrigerant and contains Chlorine. In the 1970s it was found that when Chlorine is released into the atmosphere it inadvertently causes damage to the O-Zone layer. CFC and HCFC refrigerants were banned in the […]

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Unfortunately, no.  609 certification is only meant for automotive applications. You are authorized to handle R-12 and R-134a, but anything else that is not directly correlated to your automotive cab you are not authorized to handle. Examples of this include refrigerated cargo or other secondary refrigeration systems in your van or truck. Another example would […]

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Up until recently R-22 Refrigerant was the most common type of refrigerant for home and commercial air-conditioning units. Do you have an air-conditioning unit made before 2010? If so, it takes R-22. Its popularity took off in the 1950s when it replaced R-12 Refrigerant for home and commercial use. As of January 1st, 2010 no […]

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Hydrocarbons (1)

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Hydrocarbon refrigerants are what’s known as ‘natural refrigerants.’ They are non-toxic, non O-zone depleting, and have a very low Global Warming Potential. On top of all that they are one of the most energy efficient refrigerants in the world today. The time on flurionated gas refrigerants are coming to an end and they will all […]

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R-452A (1)

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R-452A was just recently approved by the Environmental Protection Agency’s SNAP program so it is has not yet seen mainstream usage in the United States. That being said it is very difficult to just buy one jug of R-452A at this time. I have contacted a few of my distributors and they have said that […]

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CFCs & HCFCs (4)

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CFCs, or Chlorofluorocarbons, are the original refrigerant. They consist of Carbon, Chlorine, and Fluorine. When you hear someone say ‘Refrigerant,’ they are referring to CFCs. HCFCs, or Hydrochloroflourocarbons, are the close neighbor of CFCs. The main difference between the two types of refrigerant is that HCFCs contain one additional hydrogen atom compared to CFCs. Both […]

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One word. Chlorine. In the 1970s it was found that Chlorine damaged the O-Zone layer. In the 1980s it was found that the O-Zone was so damaged that a hole began to form over Antarctica. Chlorine was the culprit. One of the leading contributing factors to Chlorine being released into the atmosphere were CFC/HCFC refrigerants. […]

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As of today, in June of 2015, yes you can. However, the market on CFC/HCFC refrigerants is highly regulated. You will need to be 608 certified with the Environmental Protection Agency in order to purchase or handle any CFC/HCFC refrigerant. You can read more about certification by clicking here. CFC/HCFCs are highly regulated due to […]

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The two most common CFC/HCFC refrigerants that you are going to come across are R-12 and R-22. You may also hear these called ‘Refrigerant.’ Refrigerant is DuPont’s brand name.  Refrigerant is almost seen as a generic term for those outside of the refrigeration industry. R-12 is the oldest and is one of the original refrigerants […]

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Recover, Recycle, & Reclaim (1)

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Refrigerants are recovered to prevent them from leaking or being dispersed into the atmosphere. All types of refrigerant should be recovered either when opening a unit to work on it or during the disposal of a unit. If refrigerant is vented into the atmosphere there will be one of two effects: The Chlorine contained in […]

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HFOs (4)

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HFO refrigerants, or HydroFluroOolefins, are a new class of refrigerants designed as an alternative to the commonly used HydroFluroCarbon refrigerants that are used today. Example HFC refrigerants are the popular R-134a, R-410A, and R-404A. It was found that HFC refrigerants had a high Global Warming Potential, or GWP. This high GWP contributed towards Global Warming […]

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Solstice refrigerants are Honeywell’s brand name on new HFO refrigerants that it produces. At the moment there are only two mainstream producers of HFO refrigerants in the world. The first being Honeywell and the second being the Chemours Company. HFOs are a new class of refrigerants that are aimed to have a significantly lower Global […]

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DR-55 refrigerant, or Opteon XL55, is a new HFO refrigerant designed by The Chemours Company. This refrigerant is designed as a lower Global Warming Potential alternative to the popular HFC refrigerant R-410A. 410A systems can be easily converted to handle the new DR-55 and provides a nearly sixty percent reduction in Global Warming Potential. On […]

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Opteon refrigerants are DuPont’s, or Chemour’s, brand name of their new HFO refrigerants. HFO refrigerants are designed as an alternative to the high global warming potential HFC refrigerants used today. At this point in time, in 2015, there are only two main manufacturers of HFO refrigerants in the world. The first being the Chemours Company […]

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HFCs (1)

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In 2009 the Honeywell corporation invented a new refrigerant called Genetron Performax. (R-407F) This new refrigerant is an HFC blend containing forty percent of R-134a, thirty percent of R-125, and thirty percent of R-32. The thinking behind this refrigerant was to come up with a viable alternative to the currently used R-404A  in supermarkets and […]

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