Pressure Chart

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing a home air conditioner, refrigerator, a vehicle’s air conditioner, or a commercial cooler is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that the system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they are stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-513A XP10 Basic Info & PT Chart

R-513A is one of the newer refrigerants that falls under the Hydrofluoroolefins (HFO) refrigerant classifications. It also known under the Chemours Opteon brand name of XP10. It is an azeotropic blend consisting of R-1234yf (56%) and R-134a (44%). It also has zero temperature glide.

This refrigerant was designed as a replacement for R-134a in medium and high temperature applications. It closely matches the overall capacity and energy efficiency when compared to R-134a. It can be used in both newer applications or as a retrofit for older systems. The good news is that when performing retrofits you’ll find that R-513A is also compatible with most existing equipment design and oils of previous 134a systems. (R-513A uses POE oil) It is worth noting here that this refrigerant must be charged from the liquid phase to ensure that you get accurate composition during the charge.

As I had mentioned in the previous paragraph this was designed to be used in medium and high temperature applications. In most cases you’ll find that these applications are chillers and commercial refrigeration equipment including medium temperature commercial/industrial direct expansion refrigeration as well as hybrid cascade systems. It can also be found in water chillers, air conditioners, and heat pumps. Lastly, it can be used in centrifugal chillers, direct expansion chillers, and ice rink systems.

One of the defining factors as to why we should switch to this new HFO refrigerant is the savings in Global Warming Potential. Between the two refrigerants there is a fifty-six percent difference. R-134a has a GWP of one-thousand four-hundred and thirty while R-513A has a GWP of six-hundred and thirty-one. That is a big difference and will help your company become more environmentally friendly.

While there is a huge savings in GWP from switching over to this new refrigerant it is still worth mentioning that a GWP of six-hundred is still very high. What that means is that this R-513A refrigerant may not be around that long before it too gets phased down across the country due to a high GWP number. So, if you are in a pinch then you may consider this refrigerant but if it was me I would seriously look at natural refrigerants. Natural refrigerants will be around forever and they will not be phased down. Ultimately, the choice is up to you.

The last point to make on this R-513A refrigerant is rated as an A1 from ASHRAE. What that means is that the refrigerant is non-toxic and non-flammable. This is the exact same rating that R-134a has as well.

Alright folks, I’ve talked enough about this refrigerant. Lets get onto the pressure chart. In the table below you should find what you are looking for but if you do find that something is incorrect or if I am missing something please reach out to me and I will get it corrected as soon as possible. I strive to have this site as accurate as I can.

Temp (F)Temp (C)Liquid Pressure (PSIG)Vapor Pressure (PSIG)
-94-70-13.13-13.17
-90.4-68-12.91-12.95
-86.8-66-12.65-12.7
-83.2-64-12.37-12.42
-79.6-62-12.06-12.11
-76-60-11.71-11.77
-72.4-58-11.33-11.38
-68.8-56-10.91-10.96
-65.2-54-10.44-10.5
-61.6-52-9.93-9.99
-58-50-9.37-9.43
-54.4-48-8.76-8.82
-50.8-46-8.09-8.15
-47.2-44-7.36-7.43
-43.6-42-6.57-6.64
-40-40-5.71-5.78
-36.4-38-4.78-4.85
-32.8-36-3.78-3.85
-29.2-34-2.7-2.77
-25.6-32-1.53-1.6
-22-30-0.28-0.35
-18.4-281.071
-14.8-262.512.45
-11.2-244.063.99
-7.6-225.715.65
-4-207.487.42
-0.4-189.369.3
3.2-1611.3611.31
6.8-1413.4913.44
10.4-1215.7615.71
14-1018.1618.11
17.6-820.7120.66
21.2-623.423.36
24.8-426.2526.21
28.4-229.2629.22
32032.4432.41
35.6235.7935.76
39.2439.3239.29
42.8643.0343.01
46.4846.9446.92
501051.0451.02
53.61255.3555.33
57.21459.8759.85
60.81664.664.59
64.41869.5669.55
682074.7474.74
71.62280.1780.16
75.22485.8485.83
78.82691.7591.75
82.42897.9397.93
8630104.37104.37
89.632111.09111.09
93.234118.08118.08
96.836125.36125.36
100.438132.94132.93
10440140.82140.81
107.642149149
111.244157.51157.5
114.846166.36166.34
118.448175.52175.51
12250185.05185.02
125.652194.91194.88
129.254205.15205.1
132.856215.75215.7
136.458226.74226.68
14060238.1238.05
143.662249.89249.82
147.264262.07262
150.866274.69274.6
154.468287.74287.65
15870301.24301.14

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing a home air conditioner, refrigerator, a vehicle’s air conditioner, or a commercial cooler is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that the system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they are stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-452A XP44 Basic Info & PT Chart

R-452A is a newer refrigerant that falls into the Hydrofluoroolefins classification family (HFOs). It can also be found under the Opteon XP44 brand name from Chemours. It is a zeotropic blend of R-1234yf (30%), R-32 (11%), and R-125 (59%). This refrigerant was designed to be an alternative to the extremely high Global Warming Potential refrigerants R-404A and R-507. R-452A closely matches the performance and energy efficiency of R-404A. You’ll also find that the compressor discharge temperature nearly matches when compared to R-404A/R-507 systems in both low and medium temperature applications.

While this newer refrigerant can be used in various commercial/industrial refrigeration, condensing units, and stand alone plug-ins you are most likely to find this refrigerant being used in transport refrigeration. These are your refrigerated trucks, vans, or reefer containers. This niche application is forgotten by a lot of folks but the sheer amount of refrigerated trucks that are out there is staggering. Think about it for a moment. All of the meat, dairy, and any other cold groceries are delivered by these refrigerated trucks. All of the meat being transported from processing plant to distributor use a refrigerated truck. Heck, even the ice cream truck that rolls down your neighborhood falls under this application.

452A XP44 is ideal for newer applications but can also be used for retrofits of existing systems. It uses POE oil so in most cases you’ll find that you do not even need to swap the oil as R-404A uses POE as well. The refrigerant is also rated with an A1 safety rating from ASHRAE. What that means is that it is non-flammable and non-toxic just like R-404A is rated.

I had mentioned earlier that the idea behind this refrigerant was to provide an alternative to the extremely high GWP that is R-404A. You see R-404A has a GWP number of nearly four-thousand! That is a huge number. The good news here is that with R-452A it reduces the GWP by forty-five percent when compared to R-404A. While that is a significant number that still leaves us with a high GWP of R-452A itself.

Yes, R-452A comes in with a GWP of two-thousand one-hundred and forty-one. If you compare that to other refrigerants it is still a VERY high number. Because of this fact I have to say that I do not see this newer HFO refrigerant from Chemours lasting very long. There will come a time in the near future that this refrigerant will be phased out shortly. If you are looking into switching over your 404A system it may make more sense to either wait until a lower GWP alternative comes out or to take a serious look at natural refrigerants out there like R-744 CO2.

Alright folks, with all that being said I’ve talked enough. Let’s get onto the actual pressure chart. When I create these tables I strive to create them as accurate as possible so if you see something that is not right please reach out to me and I will get it corrected as soon as possible.

Temp (F)Temp (C)Liquid Pressure (PSIG)Vapor Pressure (PSIG)
-94-70-10.84-11.61
-90.4-68-10.33-11.19
-86.8-66-9.76-10.72
-83.2-64-9.14-10.21
-79.6-62-8.45-9.64
-76-60-7.7-9.01
-72.4-58-6.87-8.32
-68.8-56-5.97-7.56
-65.2-54-4.99-6.74
-61.6-52-3.93-5.83
-58-50-2.77-4.85
-54.4-48-1.52-3.78
-50.8-46-0.02-2.63
-47.2-441.3-1.37
-43.6-422.88-0.02
-40-404.571.45
-36.4-386.393.02
-32.8-368.354.71
-29.2-3410.446.53
-25.6-3212.678.48
-22-3015.0610.56
-18.4-2817.612.79
-14.8-2620.315.17
-11.2-2423.1817.71
-7.6-2226.2320.41
-4-2029.4723.28
-0.4-1832.926.33
3.2-1636.5329.57
6.8-1440.3733
10.4-1244.4236.62
14-1048.6940.46
17.6-853.1944.51
21.2-657.9348.79
24.8-462.9153.3
28.4-268.1458.04
32073.6363.04
35.6279.3968.29
39.2485.4273.82
42.8691.7479.61
46.4898.3585.68
5010105.2692.05
53.612112.4898.72
57.214120.02105.7
60.816127.88113.01
64.418136.08120.64
6820144.61128.61
71.622153.51136.94
75.224162.76145.62
78.826172.38154.69
82.428182.38164.14
8630192.76173.97
89.632203.55184.22
93.234214.75194.89
96.836226.36205.99
100.438238.38217.53
10440250.85229.54
107.642263.77242.02
111.244277.14254.98
114.846290.99268.45
118.448305.3282.45
12250320.1296.97
125.652335.41312.05
129.254351.22327.73
132.856367.56344
136.458384.42360.89
14060401.84378.44
143.662419.82396.69
147.264438.35415.67
150.866457.46435.44
154.468477.15456.07
15870497.41477.64

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing a home air conditioner, refrigerator, a vehicle’s air conditioner, or a commercial cooler is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that the system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they are stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-455A Solstice L40X Basic Info & PT Chart

R-455A is another newer refrigerant from the Honeywell Corporation under their Solstice brand. The actual brand name of this refrigerant is Solstice L40X. Like a lot of the other newer refrigerants this is classified as an Hydrofluoroolefins refrigerant (HFO). It is a zeotropic blend of R-1234yf (75.50%), R-32 (21.50%), and R-744 (3.00%). This refrigerant was designed as an alternative for low, medium, and high temperature applications. In most cases it was meant to be used in newer systems but there are cases where it can be used to retrofit older systems. Just note that you will have to take all of the proper steps for a full retrofit and you will most likely need to change the oil as well (R-455A uses POE oil).

L40X aims to replace some of the more popular refrigerants such as R-404A, R-22, and R-407C. It has a very close capacity level to that of R-404A and nearly matches the efficiency of 404A as well. R-455A can be used to replace R-290 Propane systems, but I’m not really sure why you would want to replace these applications. Just like the refrigerants I mentioned, R-455A works well in plug-in cabinet applications, cold/freezer rooms, chillers, heat pumps, and other types of commercial and industrial refrigeration.

The great selling point with this newer refrigerant is the GWP number. To understand the difference let’s first look at R-404A’s GWP number of nearly four-thousand. Now, we can really understand why R-455A’s GWP number of one-hundred and forty-six is so significant. That is an amazing difference between the two refrigerants. Since this refrigerant is under the one-hundred and fifty GWP number it also makes 455A F-Gas compliant with the European Union. That means that this refrigerant can be used through the EU without the risk of possible phase down. In fact Emerson Technologies, out of Missouri, has already announced that they will be using R-455A in some of their newer compressor builds.

There is a downside to this refrigerant though folks. Like most HFO refrigerants this one is rated as an A2L from ASHRAE. The A stands for non-toxic but the ‘2L’ stands for mildly flammable. All of the other refrigerants that this Solstice brand aims to replace are NOT flammable. They are all rated as an A1 from ASHRAE. What this means is that if you use this refrigerant then you are moving to increased risk. Your previous system had no flammability risk and this newest one with R-455A does. As the rating states, the risk is ‘mild.’

Something else to note is that the ‘2L’ rating from ASHRAE is newer. If you rewind about ten years ago there was no ‘2L’ rating. Refrigerants were either flammable, or they weren’t. Since the introduction of the HFO refrigerant line from Chemours and Honeywell we began to see the introduction of the ‘2L’ or mildly flammable refrigerant rating. This new rating is meant to distinguish itself from the other flammability ratings of 1, 2, and 3.

If you can get over the medium flammability risk that comes with this refrigerant then R-455A L40X is a great long term refrigerant. So many of these newer HFO refrigerants still have a higher Global Warming Potential number which will ultimately result in them being phased out in five or ten years. But, since R-455A’s GWP is under that one-hundred and fifty mark I can see it lasting for a long time. There shouldn’t be any pressure to phase this refrigerant out in the near future.  If I was purchasing a new system I would either consider this Solstice refrigerant, a hydrocarbon, or a natural refrigerant. Each one has its downsides/upsides, so the decision ultimately lies on you.

Alright folks, I’ve written enough though on this refrigerant. I know the reason you came here was for the pressure table and you can view it below. As you are viewing this table please let me know if you see anything that is incorrect or if I have missed anything. I aim to have this website as accurate as possible.

PSIGkPALiquid Temp (F)Liquid Temp (C)Vapor Temp (F)Vapor Temp (C)
14.5100-62.14-52.3-39.01-39.45
21.75150-45.96-43.31-23.04-30.58
29.01200-33.57-36.43-10.84-23.8
36.26250-23.37-30.76-0.83-18.24
43.51300-14.62-25.97.74-13.48
50.76350-6.93-21.6315.26-9.3
58.01400-0.02-17.7921.99-5.56
65.264506.26-14.328.11-2.16
72.5250012.04-11.0933.730.96
79.7755017.4-8.1138.933.85
87.0260022.41-5.3343.776.54
94.2765027.12-2.7148.339.07
101.5270031.57-0.2452.6111.45
108.7775035.82.1156.6813.71
116.0380039.814.3460.5515.86
123.2885043.666.4864.2217.9
130.5390047.348.5267.7519.86
137.7895050.8610.4871.1121.73
145.03100054.2712.3774.3523.53
152.28105057.5414.1977.4925.27
159.54110060.7115.9580.4926.94
166.79115063.7717.6583.3928.55
174.04120066.7419.386.230.11
181.29125069.6220.988.9231.62
188.54130072.4322.4691.5633.09
195.79135075.1523.9794.1234.51
203.05140077.7925.4496.6235.9
210.3145080.3826.8899.0337.24
217.55150082.8928.27101.3938.55
224.8155085.3529.64103.6939.83
232.05160087.7630.98105.9341.07
239.3165090.132.28108.1242.29
246.56170092.4133.56110.2643.48
253.81175094.6634.81112.3344.63
261.06180096.8736.04114.3945.77
268.31185099.0337.24116.3846.88
275.561900101.1638.42118.3347.96
282.811950103.2339.57120.2549.03
290.072000105.2840.71122.1350.07
297.322050107.2941.83123.9651.09
304.572100109.2642.92125.7652.09
311.822150111.244127.5453.08
319.072200113.1145.06129.2754.04
326.32225011546.11130.9854.99
333.582300116.8547.14132.6655.92
340.832350118.6748.15134.2956.83
348.082400120.4749.15135.9157.73
355.332450122.2350.13137.558.61
362.582500123.9851.1139.0659.48

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-448A Solstice N40 Basic Info & PT Chart

It seems that as the years go by we face more and more pressure to begin phasing down HFC refrigerants. As I write this article most HFCs have already been phased down across the European Union and we are not too far behind here in the United States. When a class of refrigerants are phased out there obviously needs to be another to step up and take their place. The debate is still raging on rather that should be natural refrigerants or if we should go with the newer class of refrigerants known as Hydrofluoroolefins (HFOs).

The newer refrigerant R-448A, also known as Solstice N40, is an HFO refrigerant. It was introduced by the Honeywell corporation under their new Solstice brand line. While 448A can technically be classified as an HFO refrigerant it actually has more HFC refrigerants in it. This refrigerant is a zeotropic blend of R-32 (26%), R-125 (26%), R-134a (21%), R-1234ze (7%), and R-1234yf (20%). This N40 refrigerant was designed to replace the ever popular HCFC R-22 and the HFC R-404A.

It can be used for new installations and in retrofits. I won’t get into retrofitting here, but there are many guides from OEMs and Honeywell that take you through step by step. One word of warning though is if you are trying to retrofit an R-22 unit over to this refrigerant you should know that R-448A requires POE oil while R-22 requires mineral oil. They are not interchangeable. R-404A does use POE oil so there won’t be a problem there.

This refrigerant is designed for use in low and medium temperature applications such as supermarket refrigeration, refrigerated cold stores, refrigerated transport vending machines, and industrial refrigeration. This N40 refrigerant from Honeywell has an A1 safety rating from ASHRAE. What that means is that the refrigerant is non-toxic and is not flammable. That is a big deal as so many refrigerants nowadays are rated either flammable or slightly flammable.

As I had mentioned earlier, the main point of switching to these new HFO refrigerants is to protect the climate. In the case of R-448A you will see a sixty-eight percent reduction in Global Warming Potential (GWP). That is a significant reduction. Let’s look at the numbers. R-404A has a total GWP of nearly four-thousand. R-448A has a GWP of fourteen-hundred. Along with the savings of GWP you will also find that this Solstice refrigerant runs between five to ten percent more efficient then R-404A. SO, you’ll get the benefit to the climate in two ways.

There is one big downside here on this refrigerant I want to mention before I get to the PT chart. I had stated that the GWP for this product is fourteen-hundred. While it is lower then R-404A you should be aware that it is still a very high GWP number. Because this number is so high I do not foresee this refrigerant lasting in the long run. Its GWP is just too high. I would fully predict that we would see this refrigerant being phased out in just about five years time. It will be replaced by something else down the road. This refrigerant is just a stop gap until we find something better.

Alright folks, I’ve talked enough. Let’s get to the pressure temperature chart. As you are looking over this data please reach out to me if you find something that is not correct. I strive to make these tables accurate and will get any errors corrected as soon as I can.

PSIGLiquid Temp (F)Liquid Temp (C)Vapor Temp (F)Vapor Temp (C)
0-51-46.11-39.9-39.94
1-48.6-44.78-37.5-38.61
2-46.2-43.44-35.2-37.33
3-44-42.22-32.9-36.06
4-41.9-41.06-30.8-34.89
5-39.8-39.89-28.8-33.78
6-37.8-38.78-26.9-32.72
7-35.9-37.72-25-31.67
8-34.1-36.72-23.2-30.67
9-32.4-35.78-21.4-29.67
10-30.6-34.78-19.7-28.72
11-29-33.89-18.1-27.83
12-27.4-33-16.5-26.94
13-25.8-32.11-15-26.11
14-24.3-31.28-13.5-25.28
16-21.4-29.67-10.6-23.67
18-18.6-28.11-7.8-22.11
20-16-26.67-5.2-20.67
22-13.5-25.28-2.7-19.28
24-11-23.89-0.3-17.94
26-8.7-22.612-16.67
28-6.5-21.394.2-15.44
29-5.4-20.785.3-14.83
31-3.3-19.617.4-13.67
34-0.2-17.8910.4-12
372.7-16.2813.3-10.39
405.5-14.7216-8.89
438.2-13.2218.7-7.39
4610.8-11.7821.2-6
4913.2-10.4423.7-4.61
5215.6-9.1126-3.33
5517.9-7.8328.3-2.06
5920.9-6.1731.2-0.44
6323.8-4.56341.11
6726.5-3.0636.72.61
8336.52.546.68.11
10146.58.0656.313.5
12156.213.4465.918.83
14265.418.5674.923.83
15470.221.2279.626.44
16775.123.9484.429.11
18180.226.7889.331.83
19685.329.6194.334.61
21290.532.599.337.39
22995.735.39104.340.17
246100.738.17109.142.83
264105.640.89113.945.5
284110.943.8311948.33
304115.946.61123.851
32512149.44128.653.67
348126.252.33133.656.44
349126.452.44133.856.56
372131.455.22138.559.17
397136.658.11143.461.89
423141.861148.364.61
450146.963.8315367.22

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-450A Solstice N13 Basic Info & PT Chart

The refrigerant known as R-450A is brought to you by the Honeywell corporation. This refrigerant falls under their new Hydrofluoroolefins (HFO) Solstice line of refrigerants. You may see R-450A referred to as N13 which is the official Honeywell brand name. As most of you know there has been a push to phase out HFC refrigerants such as R-134a, R-404A, R-410A across the United States. This push is due to the very high Global Warming Potential these refrigerants have.

R-450A was introduced as an alternative to the commonly used HFC R-134a. 134a has a GWP of over fourteen-hundred whereas the new 450A has a GWP of only six-hundred. That is a nearly sixty percent decrease in GWP saved by switching over to this new HFO refrigerant. It is also slightly more efficient then R-134a so users will end up seeing a savings on their energy bills as well. 450A is a Azerotropic blend of forty-two percent R-134a and fifty-eight percent of R-1234ze that uses POE oil for lubrication. While it is a mixture of HFCs and HFOs refrigerant it technically falls under the HFO classification. The good news here is that HFO refrigerants are classified as flammable or slightly flammable… but not the Solstice N13. It has an A1 safety rating from ASHRAE. That is the same safety rating that R-134a and all of the other common HFC refrigerants has. To me, that is a big selling point. There is no risk here unlike the risk you could find of when dealing with hydrocarbon or natural refrigerants. The only real thing to be concerned about here is that it still has a somewhat high GWP number… so it may be phased out in five or ten years.

This HFO refrigerant was designed to be used in a variety of medium temperature applications such as refrigerated transport, heat pumps, chillers, vending machines, super market cascade systems, and commercial/industrial refrigeration. It has been approved for use in many of these applications by the Environmental Protection Agency’s SNAP program as well. In fact, it was approved a few years ago now so you may have already run across it before. In most cases you’ll find it in only newer applications, but there is the possibility of a retrofit when it comes to vending machines.

Lastly, before I get to the PT chart I wanted to inform you that this refrigerant can actually be charged from either the liquid or the vapor phase. It is your choice. That is why in the table below I included PSIG for both liquid and vapor. If you have any questions on the table or if something appears to be incorrect PLEASE reach out to me and I will get the information updated just as soon as I can.

Temp (F)Temp (C)Liquid Pressure (PSIG)Vapor Pressure (PSIG)
-94-70-13.67-13.71
-90.4-68-13.52-13.56
-86.8-66-13.34-13.39
-83.2-64-13.14-13.19
-79.6-62-12.91-12.98
-76-60-12.66-12.73
-72.4-58-12.38-12.46
-68.8-56-12.07-12.16
-65.2-54-11.72-11.83
-61.6-52-11.34-11.46
-58-50-10.92-11.05
-54.4-48-10.46-10.6
-50.8-46-9.96-10.11
-47.2-44-9.4-9.57
-43.6-42-8.79-8.98
-40-40-8.13-8.33
-36.4-38-7.41-7.63
-32.8-36-6.63-6.87
-29.2-34-5.78-6.04
-25.6-32-4.87-5.15
-22-30-3.87-4.18
-18.4-28-2.81-3.14
-14.8-26-1.65-2.01
-11.2-24-0.42-0.8
-7.6-220.910.5
-4-202.341.89
-0.4-183.863.38
3.2-165.494.98
6.8-147.236.68
10.4-129.098.5
14-1011.0610.43
17.6-813.1612.49
21.2-615.3914.67
24.8-417.7616.99
28.4-220.2719.45
32022.9222.06
35.6225.7324.81
39.2428.6927.72
42.8631.8230.8
46.4835.1234.04
501038.5937.45
53.61242.2441.05
57.21446.0944.83
60.81650.1348.8
64.41854.3652.97
682058.857.35
71.62263.4661.94
75.22468.3466.74
78.82673.4471.77
82.42878.7877.04
863084.3582.54
89.63290.1788.28
93.23496.2594.28
96.836102.58100.53
100.438109.18107.06
10440116.06113.86
107.642123.22120.94
111.244130.67128.3
114.846138.41135.97
118.448146.46143.94
12250154.83152.22
125.652163.52160.83
129.254172.52169.77
132.856181.87179.03
136.458191.57188.66
14060201.62198.64
143.662212.03208.97
147.264222.82219.69
150.866233.99230.78
154.468245.54242.28
15870257.49254.19

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-449A XP40 Basic Info & PT Chart

R-449A is a non-azeotropic blend comprised of R-134a (25.7%), R-1234yf (25.3%), R-125 (24.7%), and R-32 (24.3%). This refrigerant falls into the new classification of refrigerants known as Hydrofluoroolefin family. You may also see R-449A labeled as XP40 or under the brand name Opteon which comes from the Chemours company. It has an A1 rating from Ashrae which means that it is one of safest refrigerants out there. (As safe as your standard HFC refrigerants like R-134a or R-404A.) This is a big point of note as most HFO refrigerants are either flammable or slightly flammable, but 449A is not.

This XP40 refrigerant was designed as a replacement for the commonly used HFC R-404A. The problem with R-404A is its immense Global Warming Potential of nearly four-thousand. R-449A is able to cut this number down to 1,397 which is almost a seventy percent reduction. It is also between eight to twelve percent more efficient then your standard R-404A systems.

Just like R-404A, R-449A’s primary applications range from industrial refrigeration and air conditioning over to commercial refrigeration found in your typical grocery store or gas station. It can even be used in ice rinks if needed. It can be used in new equipment and can also replace R-22, R-404A, R-507, and R-407A in existing equipment as long as the proper retrofitting is done. The good news is that the retrofitting procedure is quite simplistic compared to other alternative refrigerants. For a full retrofit guide click this link to be taken to the official Chemours official document.

Lastly, is your pressure temperature chart. As always if you see anything that looks incorrect please reach out to me and I will get it updated as soon as I can.

Temp (F)Temp (C)Liquid Pressure (PSIG)Vapor Pressure (PSIG)
-94-70-11.18-12.34
-90.4-68-10.71-12
-86.8-66-10.19-11.62
-83.2-64-9.62-11.19
-79.6-62-8.99-10.73
-76-60-8.3-10.21
-72.4-58-7.54-9.63
-68.8-56-6.71-9
-65.2-54-5.8-8.31
-61.6-52-4.81-7.55
-58-50-3.74-6.72
-54.4-48-2.58-5.81
-50.8-46-1.32-4.82
-47.2-440.04-3.75
-43.6-421.5-2.58
-40-403.08-1.32
-36.4-384.780.04
-32.8-366.61.52
-29.2-348.563.1
-25.6-3210.654.81
-22-3012.886.64
-18.4-2815.278.61
-14.8-2617.8110.71
-11.2-2420.5112.96
-7.6-2223.3915.37
-4-2026.4417.93
-0.4-1829.6820.66
3.2-1633.123.56
6.8-1436.7326.65
10.4-1240.5629.92
14-1044.6133.39
17.6-848.8837.06
21.2-653.3740.95
24.8-458.145.05
28.4-263.0849.38
32068.3153.95
35.6273.7958.77
39.2479.5563.83
42.8685.5869.16
46.4891.974.76
501098.5180.65
53.612105.4286.82
57.214112.6493.29
60.816120.17100.07
64.418128.04107.17
6820136.24114.59
71.622144.78122.36
75.224153.67130.47
78.826162.92138.95
82.428172.55147.8
8630182.56157.02
89.632192.95166.65
93.234203.75176.67
96.836214.95187.12
100.438226.56198
10440238.61209.31
107.642251.08221.1
111.244264.02233.33
114.846277.39246.07
118.448291.23259.3
12250305.56273.05
125.652320.36287.33
129.254335.68302.17
132.856351.48317.58
136.458367.81333.57
14060384.67350.19
143.662402.07367.43
147.264420.02385.34
150.866438.52403.96
154.468457.61423.28
15870477.27443.4

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-407F Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

As most of you know the phase out of R-22 began on January 1st, 2010. This initial phase out stated that no new R-22 machines could be imported or manufactured within the United States after this date. This was due to R-22 being directly responsible for Ozone Depletion. It is not just Ozone we have to worry about though folks. Some of these HFC refrigerants that we have been using for the past twenty years or so have a different problem called Global Warming Potential, or GWP. GWP is a measurement of how impactful a refrigerant is to Global Warming. The higher the number the more impact it will have.

One of the most notorious refrigerants in this category is known as R-404A. 404A is an HFC blend and has a GWP number of nearly four-thousand! 404A is used in low and medium temperature commercial refrigeration applications found in supermarkets, gas stations, and even vending machines. In recent years there has been a lot of pressure on companies and governments to use alternative refrigerants to R-404A in an effort to reduce their impact on the Climate.

One of these alternative refrigerants is known as R-407F also known under the name Genertron Performax LT. This product, from the Honeywell Corporation, is an HFC blend made up of R-134a, R-125, and R-32. While it does not have a perfect number when it comes to the Global Warming Potential scale it is significantly reduced when compared to R-404A. While 404A’s GWP is nearly four-thousand the R-407F comes in at only eighteen-hundred. That is a big drop! There is also no risk of Ozone Depletion.

407F was meant as a replacement for R-22 and R-404A in these supermarket/gas station applications. It is rated with an A1 grade from ASHRAE which means it is non-toxic and non-flammable. It may not be the perfect solution to those who are looking to reduce their climate footprint but you are able to retrofit exiting R-22 and R-404A units using this new refrigerant. That will save a significant amount of money versus having to purchase an entirely new system.

Regardless of what your thoughts on R-407F you will need to know the pressures and temperatures in order to properly maintenance it. Check out our chart below and if you see anything incorrect please reach out to us!

Temp (F)Temp (C)Liquid Pressure (PSIG)Vapor Pressure (PSIG)
-94-70-10.81-12.23
-90.4-68-10.29-11.86
-86.8-66-9.72-11.46
-83.2-64-9.09-11
-79.6-62-8.39-10.5
-76-60-7.63-9.94
-72.4-58-6.79-9.32
-68.8-56-5.88-8.63
-65.2-54-4.88-7.88
-61.6-52-3.8-7.05
-58-50-2.62-6.15
-54.4-48-1.34-5.16
-50.8-460.05-4.08
-47.2-441.54-2.9
-43.6-423.15-1.63
-40-404.89-0.24
-36.4-386.761.26
-32.8-368.762.88
-29.2-3410.914.62
-25.6-3213.26.5
-22-3015.668.52
-18.4-2818.2810.7
-14.8-2621.0713.02
-11.2-2424.0415.51
-7.6-2227.1918.17
-4-2030.5521
-0.4-1834.124.03
3.2-1637.8627.25
6.8-1441.8530.67
10.4-1246.0534.3
14-1050.538.16
17.6-855.1842.24
21.2-660.1246.56
24.8-465.3251.12
28.4-270.7855.95
32076.5361.03
35.6282.5566.4
39.2488.8872.04
42.8695.577.99
46.48102.4584.23
5010109.7190.79
53.612117.397.68
57.214125.24104.9
60.816133.53112.47
64.418142.17120.4
6820151.19128.7
71.622160.59137.37
75.224170.38146.44
78.826180.55155.92
82.428191.15165.81
8630202.16176.12
89.632213.61186.88
93.234225.5198.1
96.836237.84209.77
100.438250.65221.94
10440263.91234.61
107.642277.68247.79
111.244291.93261.49
114.846306.7275.73
118.448321.99290.55
12250337.81305.94
125.652354.16321.93
129.254371.08338.55
132.856388.59355.79
136.458406.65373.71
14060425.33392.33
143.662444.6411.66
147.264464.51431.74
150.866485.05452.6
154.468506.24474.31
15870528.09496.9

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-1234ze Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

The refrigerant R-1234ze is part of a new generation of refrigerants under the HFO classification. HFO’s, or hydrofluoroolefins, are a new classification of refrigerants that aim to take the place of the commonly used HFCs. These HFC refrigerants have a VERY high Global Warming Potential, or GWP. The higher the GWP the more damage the refrigerant can do to Global Warming. Remember folks that refrigerants are Greenhouse Gases and can be many times more potent then the standard Carbon Dioxide. Having these very high GWP refrigerants was causing a significant impact on Climate Change.

R-1234ze was introduced as an alternative to the R-134a HFC refrigerant. R-134 has a GWP number of over fourteen-hundred. That means it is fourteen-hundred times worse then Carbon Dioxide when released into the atmosphere. To combat this the Honeywell corporation released R-1234ze under their Solstice Refrigerants brand name. This refrigerant has no Ozone Depletion Potential and has a GWP number of only seven.When comparing that to the fourteen-hundred we saw earlier you can really see the difference.

R-1234ze can be used in a variety of applications including supermarkets, water cooled chillers, commercial buildings, vending machines, refrigerators, heat pumps, and it can even be found in cascade systems. While it was meant to replace R-134a it can also be used in place of other refrigerants such as R-744 (Carbon Dioxide) and R-600a (Isobutane).  The only major downside of this refrigerant is that it is rated as an A2L from ASHRAE. The A stands for non-toxic but that 2l rating signifies that this HFO refrigerant is slightly flammable. R-134a on the other hand had no chance of flame propagation. So, please be cognizant of the flammability risk when working with ze refrigerant.

If you are working with R-1234ze then it serves you to know the temperatures and pressures. Please check out pressure chart below. If you see any errors please feel free to let me know.

Temp (F)Temp (C)Pressure (PSIG)Pressure (kPA)
-58-50-11.75-81
-54.4-48-11.31-78
-50.8-46-10.88-75
-47.2-44-10.44-72
-43.6-42-9.86-68
-40-40-9.43-65
-36.4-38-8.85-61
-32.8-36-8.12-56
-29.2-34-7.4-51
-25.6-32-6.67-46
-22-30-5.8-40
-18.4-28-4.93-34
-14.8-26-4.06-28
-11.2-24-3.05-21
-7.6-22-1.74-12
-4-20-0.73-5
-0.4-180.584
3.2-162.0314
6.8-143.4824
10.4-124.9334
14-106.6746
17.6-88.4158
21.2-610.371
24.8-412.3385
28.4-214.5100
32016.68115
35.6219.15132
39.2421.61149
42.8624.22167
46.4827.12187
501030.02207
53.61233.07228
57.21436.4251
60.81639.89275
64.41843.51300
682047.28326
71.62251.2353
75.22455.4382
78.82659.76412
82.42864.4444
863069.18477
89.63274.11511
93.23479.34547
96.83684.85585
100.43890.5624
1044096.45665
107.642102.69708
111.244109.07752
114.846115.74798
118.448122.56845
12250129.95896
125.652137.35947
129.254145.181001
132.856153.311057
136.458161.721115
14060170.421175

 

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-123 Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

R-123 refrigerant is most likely a rare find nowadays. It was originally introduced in the 1990’s as a replacement for the now phased out refrigerant known as R-11. You see R-11 contained chlorine. It was found that refrigerants that contain chlorine can actively damage the Ozone layer if they are released into the atmosphere. Once this was found out the world banded together and formed an international treaty known as the Montreal Protocol. This protocol banned CFC and HCFC refrigerants.

When R-11 was banned R-123 began to see more and more use in larger low pressure centrifugal chillers. It was hugely efficient and it had a much lower Ozone Depletion Potential then its predecessor. There were a lot of downsides to R-123 though. One of the biggest was that it was rated as a B1 on ASHRAE’s safety scale. That means that the refrigerant was toxic if breathed in or if you were exposed to it. This alone takes a lot of points away from its appeal but couple that with it being an HCFC refrigerant with an Ozone Depletion Potential as well then you have a perfect storm for another phase out.

R-123 was meant as a substitute or a standby when R-11 was phased out. It wasn’t meant as a permanent solution. That is why you now see more R-134a applications when it comes to centrifugal chillers. Not even R-134a is safe though folks as they are already trying to phase this out as well due to it’s high Global Warming Potential. The refrigerant market is always changing…

If you do in the off chance run into an R-123 system then you are going to need to know the pressures. Let’s take a look at our pressure chart below:

Temp (F)Temp (C)Pressure (PSIG)Pressure Liquid (PSIA)
-20-28.8827.81
-15-26.1127.41.2
-10-23.3326.91.4
-5-20.5526.41.7
0-17.7725.92
5-1525.22.3
10-12.2224.52.6
15-9.4423.83
20-6.6622.83.5
25-3.8821.84
30-1.1120.74.5
351.6619.55.1
404.4418.15.8
457.2216.66.5
501014.97.3
5512.77138.2
6015.5511.29.2
6518.338.910.3
7021.116.511.4
7523.884.112.7
8026.661.214.1
8529.440.915.6
9032.222.517.2
95354.318.9
10037.776.120.8
10540.558.122.8
11043.3310.325
11546.1112.627.3
12048.8815.129.8
12551.6617.832.4
13054.4420.635.3
13557.2223.638.3
1406026.841.5
14562.7730.244.9
15065.5533.948.5
15568.3352.3
16071.1156.4
16573.8860.7
17076.6665.2
17579.4470
18082.2275
1858580.3
19087.7785.9
19590.5591.7
20093.3397.9

 

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-23 Refrigerant Pressure Chart

R-23 refrigerant is not commonly used. When you do run into it it is typically used in a cascade setup in a low temperature refrigeration system. It was originally developed as an alternative to the R-13 refrigerant. R-13 was a CFC refrigerant and was banned across the world in the early 1990’s due to it’s damaging of the Ozone layer. This was all done through the treaty known as the Montreal Protocol.

When R-13 was banned the HFC refrigerant R-23 took it’s place. It solved the problem with the Ozone but now there was a new problem with R-23. This new problem is known as Global Warming Potential (GWP). The higher the GWP number the more impact the refrigerant has on the environment.

Carbon Dioxide (R-744) is used as the zero measure for this scale. Any number above zero is that much more potent then Carbon Dioxide. In the case of R-23 its GWP number is over fourteen-thousand. Yes folks, you read that right. R-23 is fourteen-thousand times more damaging to the environment then Carbon Dioxide. It is because of this extremely high number that you will not find too many R-23 systems today. It is being replaced by more climate friendly refrigerants.

However, if you do run across one though you will need to know the pressure. Let’s take a look at our pressure chart below. (Note that the first pressure value is in Vacuum inches in Hg.):

Temp (F)Temp (C)Pressure (PSIG)
-119.92-84.44
-115.06-81.70.3
-110.02-78.92.9
-104.98-76.15.8
-99.94-73.39
-95.08-70.612.7
-90.04-67.816.7
-85-6521.3
-79.96-62.226.3
-74.92-59.431.8
-70.06-56.737.9
-65.02-53.944.6
-59.98-51.152
-54.94-48.360
-50.08-45.668.7
-45.04-42.878.1
-40-4088.3
-34.96-37.299.4
-29.92-34.4111
-25.06-31.7124
-20.02-28.9138

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-12 Pressure Chart

R-12 is one of those classic refrigerants that nearly everyone has heard of before. Even if you are not part of the industry chances are you have heard of R-12. You see, R-12 is a CFC refrigerant and was one of the first artificially created refrigerants to see widespread usage. It was in the 1930’s that the DuPont corporation teamed up with General Motors to come up with a safe, reliable, and cheap refrigerant. All of the previous refrigerants like ammonia, propane, isobutane, and even carbon dioxide all had their own problems. Sometimes it was flammability, toxicity, or operating pressure. Regardless of why these natural refrigerants weren’t working it was clear that the market needed a different kind of refrigerant.

It was during this partnership that we began to see the rise of artificial refrigerant classifications known as CFCs and HCFCs. Only shortly after their invention these new refrigerants began to take the world by storm. Not more then thirty years later and you could find R-12 all over the world in all kinds of different applications. Its explosive growth continued over the years. So did the related refrigerants known as R-11, R-22, R-502 and many others. The world was being filled with CFC and HCFC refrigerants.

It was in the 1980’s that a team of scientists discovered that these refrigerants did have a downside… and it was a big one. You see if these refrigerants were vented into the atmosphere either through damage, mistake, or malfeasance the chlorine in these refrigerants would make its way up into the Stratosphere. In here the sun’s ultraviolet rays would break down the chlorine. This broken down chlorine would chip away at what’s known as the Ozone layer. Eventually a hole developed which caused the world to band together and create a global treaty known as the Montreal Protocol. The treaty aimed at phasing out all of these Ozone damaging refrigerants.

One of the first refrigerants to go was our friend R-12. At this point in time, in the early 1990’s, R-12 had seen the majority of it’s usage in automobile air conditioning. R-12 was banned in new automobiles and was replaced with by the HFC refrigerant we all know today as R-134a. Now, there are still some R-12 applications out there today. Most of these are through antique car collectors but there are other applications out there as well.

If you are working on an R-12 machine you are going to need to know your pressures. Let’s take a look at our pressure chart. (Note that the first few pressure values  are in Vacuum inches in Hg.):

Temp (F)Temp (C)Pressure (PSIG)
-40-4011
-34.96-37.28.4
-29.92-34.45.5
-25.06-31.72.3
-20.02-28.90.6
-14.98-26.12.4
-9.94-23.34.5
-5.08-20.66.7
-0.04-17.89.2
5-1511.8
10.04-12.214.6
15.08-9.417.7
19.94-6.721
24.98-3.924.6
30.02-1.128.5
35.061.732.6
39.924.437
44.967.241.7
501046.7
55.0412.852
60.0815.657.7
64.9418.363.8
69.9821.170.2
75.0223.977
80.0626.784.2
84.9229.491.8
89.9632.299.8
9535108
100.0437.8117
105.0840.6127
109.9443.3136
114.9846.1147
120.0248.9158
125.0651.7169
129.9254.4181
134.9657.2194
14060207
145.0462.8220
150.0865.6234

 

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-502 Pressure Chart

R-502 is one of those refrigerants you just do not see around much anymore. R-502 is a CFC refrigerant just like its cousin refrigerant R-12 and R-11. All of these refrigerants were found to be damaging the Ozone layer when they were released into the atmosphere. Because of this, these refrigerants were phased out across the world through a global treaty known as the Montreal Protocol. R-12 was one of the first ones to go but R-502 wasn’t far behind. It’s complete phase out occurred in 1995.

Originally, R-502 was designed to operate in a low temperature refrigerant applications. It was meant as an alternative to the very popular HCFC known as R-22. R-502 had an overall lower discharge temperature and an improved capacity allowance when compared to R-22. This made it a great alternative… until the phase outs began. Nowadays it is a rare feat to find a functioning R-502 system. Most of these have been retired due to old age or they have been retrofitted to accept a new refrigerant. The most common replacement refrigerant was the HFC R-404A, but now even 404A is being phased out due to it’s high Global Warming Potential.

In the off chance that you do come across a R-502 application then you will need to know the pressures. Let’s take a look at our pressure chart below:

Temp (F)Temp (C)Pressure (PSIG)
-40-404.1
-34.96-37.26.5
-29.92-34.49.2
-25.06-31.712.1
-20.02-28.915.3
-14.98-26.118.8
-9.94-23.322.6
-5.08-20.626.7
-0.04-17.831.1
5-1535.9
10.04-12.241
15.08-9.446.5
19.94-6.752.4
24.98-3.958.8
30.02-1.165.6
35.061.772.8
39.924.480.5
44.967.288.7
501097.4
55.0412.8107
60.0815.6116
64.9418.3127
69.9821.1138
75.0223.9149
80.0626.7161
84.9229.4174
89.9632.2187
9535201
100.0437.8216
105.0840.6232
109.9443.3248
114.9846.1265
120.0248.9283
125.0651.7301
129.9254.4321
134.9657.2341
14060363

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-717 Ammonia Pressure Chart

Ammonia, also known as R-717, is one of the oldest refrigerants. It’s origins as a refrigerant can be traced all the way back to the 1800’s and it was one of the first refrigerants used in a variety of applications. It is also widely considered one of the most efficient refrigerants available. The downside though is that ammonia is toxic in small quantities and can be deadly when released in larger quantities.

When the first artificial refrigerants were invented in the 1930’s the world began to move away from the natural refrigerants including ammonia. These artificial refrigerants like R-12 and R-22 were becoming the refrigerant used in nearly every application.  It wasn’t until the 1980’s and 1990’s, when these artificial refrigerants began to be phased out, that we saw natural refrigerants began to rise again.

In today’s world R-717 has made an amazing comeback. It can be found in varying ranges of applications. Because it is so efficient it is often used in very large applications such as meat packing/processing plants, refrigerated warehousing, and even ice rinks. Unfortunately, these large quantities of ammonia can also lead to disaster if a leak occurs. In some extreme cases deaths have occurred due to large ammonia refrigerant leaks. It is always best practice to maintenance and take proper care of your system to ensure that no leaks can occur and if they do that they are minimal.

Let’s take a look at our pressure chart on ammonia:

Temp (F)Temp (C)Pressure (PSIG)
15870-13.1
-90.4-68-12.85
-86.8-66-12.58
-83.2-64-12.26
-79.6-62-11.91
-76-60-11.51
-72.4-58-11.07
-68.8-56-10.58
-65.2-54-10.04
-61.6-52-9.43
-58-50-8.77
-54.4-48-8.03
-50.8-46-7.22
-47.2-44-6.33
-43.6-42-5.36
-40-40-4.29
-36.4-38-3.13
-32.8-36-1.86
-29.2-34-0.49
-25.6-321.01
-22-302.63
-18.4-284.38
-14.8-266.27
-11.2-248.31
-7.6-2210.51
-4-2012.87
-0.4-1815.41
3.2-1618.13
6.8-1421.04
10.4-1224.15
14-1027.46
17.6-831.01
21.2-634.78
24.8-438.79
28.4-243.05
32047.57
35.6252.37
39.2457.45
42.8662.82
46.4868.5
501074.49
53.61280.82
57.21487.48
60.81694.5
64.418101.88
6820109.65
71.622117.8
75.224126.35
78.826135.31
82.428144.71
8630154.56
89.632164.85
93.234175.61
96.836186.86
100.438198.59
10440210.84
107.642223.62
111.244236.93
114.846250.81
118.448265.23
12250280.24
125.652295.86
129.254312.08
132.856328.93
136.458346.42
14060364.57
143.662383.39
147.264402.91
150.866423.14
154.468444.08
15870465.77

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-407C Pressure Chart

R-407C is one of the many replacement products for the now phased out R-22. R-22’s official phase down started in 2010 and the final phase out began on January 1st, 2020. Over that ten year period there were hundreds, and I really mean hundreds, of R-22 alternatives created. One of these replacement products was the hydroflurocarbon blend known as R-407C.

R-407C is a zeotropic blend of R-32 (Difluromethane), R-125, and R-134a (Tetrafluoroethane). It is not a drop in replacement on R-22 machines. If you wish to use this product you will need to vacate all of the old R-22 out of the system. This is due to the R-22 systems using mineral oil and this HFC blend using POE oil. You will also need to replace the compressor as well. If this is not done then you risk destroying your air conditioner.

It is difficult to say exactly how long R-407C will be around. With each year that passes the R-22 machines grow older and older. By the year 2030 there will be very few of them left. Before then though, R-407C will still be needed.

Let’s take a look at our pressure chart:

Temp (F)Temp (C)Liquid Pressure (PSIG)Vapor Pressure (PSIG)
-94-70-11.28-12.63
-90.4-68-10.82-12.32
-86.8-66-10.31-11.97
-83.2-64-9.75-11.59
-79.6-62-9.14-11.15
-76-60-8.46-10.67
-72.4-58-7.71-10.14
-68.8-56-6.9-9.55
-65.2-54-6.01-8.9
-61.6-52-5.04-8.19
-58-50-3.98-7.41
-54.4-48-2.84-6.55
-50.8-46-1.6-5.61
-47.2-44-0.26-4.59
-43.6-421.19-3.48
-40-402.75-2.27
-36.4-384.43-0.96
-32.8-366.230.46
-29.2-348.161.99
-25.6-3210.233.64
-22-3012.455.42
-18.4-2814.817.33
-14.8-2617.339.38
-11.2-2420.0111.58
-7.6-2222.8713.93
-4-2025.916.44
-0.4-1829.1219.12
3.2-1632.5321.98
6.8-1436.1425.02
10.4-1239.9628.25
14-1043.9931.68
17.6-848.2535.32
21.2-652.7339.17
24.8-457.4643.25
28.4-262.4347.56
32067.6552.11
35.6273.1456.92
39.2478.961.98
42.8684.9467.31
46.4891.2772.92
501097.8978.82
53.612104.8285.01
57.214112.0691.51
60.816119.6398.33
64.418127.53105.48
6820135.76112.96
71.622144.35120.79
75.224153.29128.98
78.826162.62137.55
82.428172.3146.48
8630182.38155.82
89.632192.86165.56
93.234203.74175.71
96.836215.04186.3
100.438226.77197.32
10440238.92208.8
107.642251.53220.75
111.244264.6233.19
114.846278.12246.12
118.448292.13259.56
12250306.63273.54
125.652321.62288.06
129.254337.14303.14
132.856353.18318.81
136.458369.74335.08
14060386.85351.97
143.662404.52369.52
147.264422.78387.73
150.866441.6406.65
154.468461.03426.31
15870481.05446.75

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

R-134a is the most common refrigerant found in automobiles today. It has been in use since the early 1990’s and now, in 2019, we are beginning to see it’s popularity wane with the rise of the new HFO refrigerant known as R-1234yf. That being said, there are still millions of cars on the road that use R-134a and there will be continue to be for at least another decade or more.

When something does go wrong with your car’s air conditioner  a lot of folks are not sure what to do or where to even start. One of the very first steps is to check the pressure of your system. Understanding the pressure that your system is at as well as knowing what the saturation point is of R-134a will allow you to properly diagnose what is wrong with your system. Remember, that air conditioning is basically changing the pressure on the refrigerant until a state change is reached. If your pressure is off then that could point you in the right direction.

With the facts behind you can then begin to determine if your compressor is at fault, perhaps your condenser, or it could be something as simple as your blower motor needing replaced. Without knowing the pressure in your system and the corresponding saturation point then you are in essence going in blind when you attempt to troubleshoot your air conditioning system. I can assure you that when you take your vehicle into a dealership that the pressure and temperature are one of the first things they check when troubleshooting.

For more information on R-134a click here to be taken to our official ‘R-134a Refrigerant Fact and Information Sheet.’ This fact sheet goes into anything and everything you’d ever want to know about R-134a. There’s quite a bit to read, but if it is definitely worth your while if you’re interesting learning more about this HFC refrigerant.

Our R-134a pressure chart can be found below:

°F°CPSIKPA
-49-4518.4126.9
-48-44.418124.1
-47-43.917.6121.3
-46-43.317.3119.3
-45-42.816.9116.5
-44-42.216.5113.8
-43-41.716.1111
-42-41.115.7108.2
-41-40.615.2104.8
-40-4014.8102
-39-39.414.499.3
-38-38.913.995.8
-37-38.313.492.4
-36-37.81389.6
-35-37.212.586.2
-34-36.71282.7
-33-36.111.478.6
-32-35.610.975.2
-31-3510.471.7
-30-34.49.867.6
-29-33.99.364.1
-28-33.38.760
-27-32.88.155.8
-26-32.27.551.7
-25-31.76.947.6
-24-31.16.343.4
-23-30.65.739.3
-22-30534.5
-21-29.44.329.6
-20-28.93.725.5
-19-28.3320.7
-18-27.82.315.9
-17-27.21.510.3
-16-26.70.85.5
-15-26.10.10.7
-14-25.60.42.8
-13-250.74.8
-12-24.41.17.6
-11-23.91.510.3
-10-23.31.913.1
-9-22.82.416.5
-8-22.22.819.3
-7-21.73.222.1
-6-21.13.624.8
-5-20.64.128.3
-4-204.631.7
-3-19.4534.5
-2-18.95.537.9
-1-18.3641.4
0-17.86.544.8
1-17.2748.3
2-16.77.551.7
3-16.1855.2
4-15.68.558.6
5-159.162.7
6-14.49.666.2
7-13.910.270.3
8-13.310.874.5
9-12.811.377.9
10-12.211.982
11-11.712.586.2
12-11.113.190.3
13-10.613.895.1
14-1014.499.3
15-9.415103.4
16-8.915.7108.2
17-8.316.4113.1
18-7.817117.2
19-7.217.7122
20-6.718.4126.9
21-6.119.1131.7
22-5.619.9137.2
23-520.6142
24-4.421.3146.9
25-3.922.1152.4
26-3.322.9157.9
27-2.823.7163.4
28-2.224.5168.9
29-1.725.3174.4
30-1.126.1180
31-0.626.9185.5
32027.8191.7
330.628.6197.2
341.129.5203.4
351.730.4209.6
362.231.3215.8
372.832.2222
383.333.1228.2
393.934.1235.1
404.435241.3
41536248.2
425.637255.1
436.138262
446.739268.9
457.240.1276.5
467.841.1283.4
478.342.2291
488.943.2297.9
499.444.3305.4
501045.4313
5110.646.6321.3
5211.147.7328.9
5311.748.9337.2
5412.250344.7
5512.851.2353
5613.352.4361.3
5713.953.6369.6
5814.454.9378.5
591556.1386.8
6015.657.4395.8
6116.158.7404.7
6216.760413.7
6317.261.3422.6
6417.862.7432.3
6518.364441.3
6618.965.4450.9
6719.466.8460.6
682068.2470.2
6920.669.7480.6
7021.171.1490.2
7121.772.6500.6
7222.274.1510.9
7322.875.6521.2
7423.377.1531.6
7523.978.7542.6
7624.480.2553
772581.8564
7825.683.4575
7926.185586.1
8026.786.7597.8
8127.288.4609.5
8227.890620.5
8328.391.8632.9
8428.993.5644.7
8529.495.2656.4
863097668.8
8730.698.8681.2
8831.1100.6693.6
8931.7102.5706.7
9032.2104.3719.1
9132.8106.2732.2
9233.3108.1745.3
9333.9110758.4
9434.4112772.2
9535114786
9635.6115.9799.1
9736.1118813.6
9836.7120827.4
9937.2122.1841.9
10037.8124.2856.3
10138.3126.3870.8
10238.9128.4885.3
10339.4130.6900.5
10440132.8915.6
10540.6135930.8
10641.1137.2946
10741.7139.5961.8
10842.2141.7977
10942.8144992.8
11043.3146.41009.4
11143.9148.71025.3
11244.4151.11041.8
11345153.51058.3
11445.61561075.6
11546.1158.41092.1
11646.7160.91109.4
11747.2163.51127.3
11847.81661144.5
11948.3168.61162.5
12048.9171.21180.4
12149.4173.81198.3
12250176.51216.9
12350.6179.11234.9
12451.1181.81253.5
12551.7184.61272.8
12652.2187.41292.1
12752.8190.21311.4
12853.31931330.7
12953.9195.81350
13054.4198.71370
13155201.61390
13255.6204.61410.7
13356.1207.61431.4
13456.7210.61452
13557.2213.61472.7
13657.8216.71494.1
13758.3219.81515.5
13858.9222.91536.8
13959.42261558.2
14060229.21580.3
14160.6232.51603
14261.1235.71625.1
14361.72391647.8
14462.2242.31670.6
14562.8245.71694
14663.3249.11717.5
14763.9252.51740.9
14864.4255.91764.4
14965259.41788.5
15065.6262.91812.6

Conclusion

There you have it folks. I hope this article was helpful and if you find that something is inaccurate here in my chart please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I have sourced this the best I could but there is always going to be conflicting data.  I’ve seen it multiple times on various refrigerants. I’ll search for a refrigerant’s pressure chart and get various results all showing different pounds per square inch temperatures.

The aim with this article is to give you accurate information so again, if you see anything incorrect please let me know by contacting me here. On top of this post we are also working on a comprehensive refrigerant pressure/temperature listing. The goal is to have every refrigerant out there listed with a pressure/temperature chart that is easily available. 

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

Owner

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

Regardless of what system you are working on rather it is a home air conditioner, a vehicle’s air conditioner, a supermarket refrigeration system, or a large scale industrial application they all have one thing in common: Pressure.

Yes, as we all know one of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing a refrigeration or air conditioning system is determining the various pressures that the system is operating at. Besides a simple visual inspection knowing the operating pressures of the machine is crucial. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what your subcool is and what is your superheat? Having and understanding these numbers is instrumental to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-744 Carbon Dioxide Pressure Chart

For those of us here in the United States coming across an R-744 Carbon Dioxide application may still be a rare occurrence. But, the world is changing and the popularity of this natural refrigerant is increasing. Along with the popularity the vast array of applications is increasing as well. You can find R-744 being used in vending machines, automobiles, supermarkets, and even in ice-skating rinks. The sheer versatility of R-744 and its climate friendliness is the reason we have seen such growth in its uses.

While we had mentioned earlier the concept of ‘subcool,’ it is important to note that in most cases R-744 applications do not have a subcool. This is because most R-744 systems operate as a transcritical system. Most refrigeration/air conditioning systems operate in what’s known as a subcritical process. This is your standard process that we are all used to. The difference with a R-744 application is that its operating temperatures can exceed the critical point temperature.  Carbon Dioxide’s critical temperature is just under eighty-eight degrees Fahrenheit. That eighty-eight degrees mark can easily be at or below the ambient temperature and when this occurs is when a transcritical system is required.

For more information on transcritical systems you can click here to be taken to our overview. The pressure and temperatures for R-744 can be found below:

°F°CPSIKPA
-68.8-5662.26429.3
-65.2-5469.13476.6
-61.6-5276.45527.1
-58.0-5084.25580.9
-54.4-4892.54638.0
-50.8-46101.33698.6
-47.2-44110.66763.0
-43.6-42120.53831.0
-40.0-40130.96902.9
-36.4-38141.98978.9
-32.8-36153.611059.1
-29.2-34165.871143.6
-25.6-32178.771232.6
-22.0-30192.341326.1
-18.4-28206.61424.5
-14.8-26221.561527.6
-11.2-24237.251635.8
-7.6-22253.691749.1
-4.0-20270.91867.8
-0.4-18288.911992.0
3.2-16307.752121.9
6.8-14327.412257.4
10.4-12347.962399.1
14.0-10369.372546.7
17.6-8391.72700.7
21.2-6414.982861.2
24.8-4439.213028.2
28.4-2464.423202.1
32.00490.653382.9
35.62517.943571.1
39.24546.293766.5
42.86575.753969.7
46.48606.364180.7
50.010638.134399.8
53.612671.124627.2
57.214705.354863.2
60.816740.885108.2
64.418777.755362.4
68.020816.035626.3
71.622855.765900.3
75.224897.036184.8
78.826939.956480.7

Conclusion

There you have it folks. I hope this article was helpful and if you find that something is inaccurate here in my chart please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I have sourced this the best I could but there is always going to be conflicting data.  I’ve seen it multiple times on various refrigerants. I’ll search for a refrigerant’s pressure chart and get various results all showing different pounds per square inch temperatures.

The aim with this article is to give you accurate information so again, if you see anything incorrect please let me know by contacting me here. On top of this post we are also working on a comprehensive refrigerant pressure/temperature listing. The goal is to have every refrigerant out there listed with a pressure/temperature chart that is easily available.

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

Sources

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

The HFO R-1234yf is the refrigerant of the future. Or, at least, that is how it has been marketed. Yf was the first HFO refrigerant to see mainstream attention. A few years back there was immense pressure in the European Union to stop using the HFC R-134a for automotive air conditioning. The pressure was there due to the extremely high Global Warming Potential (GWP) that R-134a has. R-134a has a GWP of one-thousand four-hundred and thirty. It is classified as a super pollutant.

The answer to the world’s problems came with the announcement of the new HFO refrigerant known as R-1234yf. Yf refrigerant has a Global Warming Potential of only four. That is a huge difference when comparing it to other refrigerants on the market today. The only downside for yf is that it is rated as slightly flammable or 2L from ASHRAE and other air conditioning organizations.

The European Union quickly phased down and out R-134a and had their new vehicles start taking R-1234yf. While the acceptance of yf is much slower here in the United States there are numerous vehicle manufacturers who have begun using this refrigerant in their newer model vehicles. With each year that passes more and more vehicles begin taking yf.

To read more about 1234yf please click here to be taken to our official refrigerant fact sheet on yf.

1234yf Pressure Chart

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing a vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

The chart below details the pressures and the saturation point, or boiling point, R-1234yf:

°F °C PSI KPA
-94 -70 -9.82 -67.7
-90.4 -68 -9.26 -63.8
-86.8 -66 -8.65 -59.6
-83.2 -64 -7.99 -55.1
-79.6 -62 -7.27 -50.1
-76 -60 -6.49 -44.7
-72.4 -58 -5.65 -39.0
-68.8 -56 -4.73 -32.6
-65.2 -54 -3.75 -25.9
-61.6 -52 -2.69 -18.5
-58 -50 -1.55 -10.7
-54.4 -48 -0.33 -2.3
-50.8 -46 0.99 6.8
-47.2 -44 2.39 16.5
-43.6 -42 3.89 26.8
-40 -40 5.49 37.9
-36.4 -38 7.19 49.6
-32.8 -36 9.01 62.1
-29.2 -34 10.94 75.4
-25.6 -32 12.99 89.6
-22 -30 15.17 104.6
-18.4 -28 17.47 120.5
-14.8 -26 19.91 137.3
-11.2 -24 22.49 155.1
-7.6 -22 25.21 173.8
-4 -20 28.08 193.6
-0.4 -18 31.11 214.5
3.2 -16 34.29 236.4
6.8 -14 37.64 259.5
10.4 -12 41.17 283.9
14 -10 44.87 309.4
17.6 -8 48.75 336.1
21.2 -6 52.82 364.2
24.8 -4 57.09 393.6
28.4 -2 61.56 424.4
32 0 66.23 456.6
35.6 2 71.11 490.3
39.2 4 76.21 525.4
42.8 6 81.54 562.2
46.4 8 87.09 600.5
50 10 92.89 640.5
53.6 12 98.92 682.0
57.2 14 105.21 725.4
60.8 16 111.75 770.5
64.4 18 118.55 817.4
68 20 125.63 866.2
71.6 22 132.98 916.9
75.2 24 140.62 969.5
78.8 26 148.54 1024.1
82.4 28 156.77 1080.9
86 30 165.3 1139.7
89.6 32 174.15 1200.7
93.2 34 183.32 1263.9
96.8 36 192.82 1329.4
100.4 38 202.65 1397.2
104 40 212.85 1467.5
107.6 42 223.39 1540.2
111.2 44 234.29 1615.4
114.8 46 245.57 1693.1
118.4 48 257.24 1773.6
122 50 269.31 1856.8
125.6 52 281.76 1942.7
129.2 54 94.75 653.3
132.8 56 100.09 690.1
136.4 58 105.62 728.2
140 60 111.34 767.7
143.6 62 117.26 808.5
147.2 64 123.38 850.7
150.8 66 129.71 894.3
154.4 68 136.26 939.5
158 70 143 986.0

 

Conclusion

There you have it folks. I hope this article was helpful and if you find that something is inaccurate here in my chart please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I have sourced this the best I could but there is always going to be conflicting data.  I’ve seen it multiple times on various refrigerants. I’ll search for a refrigerant’s pressure chart and get various results all showing different pounds per square inch temperatures.

The aim with this article is to give you accurate information so again, if you see anything incorrect please let me know by contacting me here. On top of this post we are also working on a comprehensive refrigerant pressure/temperature listing. The goal is to have every refrigerant out there listed with a pressure/temperature chart that is easily available. 

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

Owner

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-32 Pressure Chart

The HFC R-32 refrigerant is quickly becoming popular, more so then it already was. Most of you know R-32 as a necessary component in the widely popular HFC blend known as R-410A Puron. R-32 along with R-125 gets you that R-410A that is found in nearly every air conditioner today.

However, in recent years there has been a push to slowly phase down R-410A. That is because of 410A’s very high Global Warming Potential, or GWP. The higher the GWP the more harm the refrigerant does to the climate. R-410A has a GWP of over two-thousand whereas R-32 has a GWP of only six-hundred and seventy-five.

While R-32 isn’t perfect it is a lot better then R-410A. That is why we are beginning to see a rise of usage of R-32 in the European Union and here in the United States as well. I do not foresee this becoming a long term trend but only as a temporary place holder until the world finds a more suitable R-410A replacement.

If you would like to read more about R-32 refrigerant please click here to be taken to our refrigerant fact sheet.

Let’s take a look at our pressure chart:

°F °C PSI KPA
-94 -70 -9.46 -65.2
-90.4 -68 -8.77 -60.5
-86.8 -66 -8.02 -55.3
-83.2 -64 -7.19 -49.6
-79.6 -62 -6.27 -43.2
-76 -60 -5.27 -36.3
-72.4 -58 -4.17 -28.8
-68.8 -56 -2.98 -20.5
-65.2 -54 -1.67 -11.5
-61.6 -52 -0.26 -1.8
-58 -50 1.28 8.8
-54.4 -48 2.95 20.3
-50.8 -46 4.75 32.8
-47.2 -44 6.69 46.1
-43.6 -42 8.78 60.5
-40 -40 11.04 76.1
-36.4 -38 13.45 92.7
-32.8 -36 16.05 110.7
-29.2 -34 18.82 129.8
-25.6 -32 21.79 150.2
-22 -30 24.96 172.1
-18.4 -28 28.34 195.4
-14.8 -26 31.94 220.2
-11.2 -24 35.77 246.6
-7.6 -22 39.83 274.6
-4 -20 44.15 304.4
-0.4 -18 48.72 335.9
3.2 -16 53.56 369.3
6.8 -14 58.68 404.6
10.4 -12 64.09 441.9
14 -10 69.79 481.2
17.6 -8 75.81 522.7
21.2 -6 82.15 566.4
24.8 -4 88.82 612.4
28.4 -2 95.84 660.8
32 0 103.21 711.6
35.6 2 110.95 765.0
39.2 4 119.07 821.0
42.8 6 127.58 879.6
46.4 8 136.49 941.1
50 10 145.81 1005.3
53.6 12 155.57 1072.6
57.2 14 165.76 1142.9
60.8 16 176.41 1216.3
64.4 18 187.53 1293.0
68 20 199.13 1373.0
71.6 22 211.21 1456.2
75.2 24 223.81 1543.1
78.8 26 236.93 1633.6
82.4 28 250.59 1727.8
86 30 264.8 1825.7
89.6 32 279.57 1927.6
93.2 34 294.93 2033.5
96.8 36 310.89 2143.5
100.4 38 327.47 2257.8
104 40 344.67 2376.4
107.6 42 362.51 2499.4
111.2 44 381.05 2627.2
114.8 46 400.24 2759.6
118.4 48 420.15 2896.8
122 50 440.79 3039.1
125.6 52 462.17 3186.6
129.2 54 484.33 3339.3
132.8 56 507.27 3497.5
136.4 58 531.02 3661.3
140 60 555.63 3830.9
143.6 62 581.1 4006.5
147.2 64 607.49 4188.5
150.8 66 634.81 4376.9
154.4 68 663.11 4572.0
158 70 692.45 4774.3

Conclusion

There you have it folks. I hope this article was helpful and if you find that something is inaccurate here in my chart please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I have sourced this the best I could but there is always going to be conflicting data.  I’ve seen it multiple times on various refrigerants. I’ll search for a refrigerant’s pressure chart and get various results all showing different pounds per square inch temperatures.

The aim with this article is to give you accurate information so again, if you see anything incorrect please let me know by contacting me here. On top of this post we are also working on a comprehensive refrigerant pressure/temperature listing. The goal is to have every refrigerant out there listed with a pressure/temperature chart that is easily available. 

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

Owner

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-22 Pressure Chart

R-22 refrigerant is the major refrigerant, or… it was. R-22 was invented by a partnership with General Motors and DuPont back in the 1930’s. In the 1950’s the use of R-22 exploded and for nearly sixty years it was THE refrigerant to be used in home, office, and commercial air conditioning. Along with air conditioning it was also used in chillers, ice rinks, and many other applications.

It was in the 1980’s that it was discovered that R-22 was damaging the Ozone layer with the chlorine that it contained. In order to correct this R-22 was phased out across the world. Here in America our phase out began in 2010 and the refrigerant will be completely phased out in 2020. Taking R-22’s place is the HFC refrigerant blend known as R-410A, our Puron.

As I write this article, in 2019, there are still thousands of R-22 machines out there, but they are a dying breed and within the next ten to twenty years R-22 will be as rare to find as R-12 is today.

If you would like to read more about R-22 Freon  refrigerant please click here to be taken to our refrigerant fact sheet.

Let’s take a look at our pressure chart:

°F °C PSI KPA
-40 -40.0 0.5 3.4
-35 -37.2 2.6 17.9
-30 -34.4 4.9 33.8
-25 -31.7 7.4 51.0
-20 -28.9 10.1 69.6
-15 -26.1 13.2 91.0
-10 -23.3 16.5 113.8
-5 -20.6 20.1 138.6
0 -17.8 24 165.5
5 -15.0 28.2 194.4
10 -12.2 32.8 226.1
15 -9.4 37.7 259.9
20 -6.7 43 296.5
25 -3.9 48.8 336.5
30 -1.1 54.9 378.5
35 1.7 61.5 424.0
40 4.4 68.5 472.3
45 7.2 76 524.0
50 10.0 84 579.2
55 12.8 92.6 638.5
60 15.6 102 703.3
65 18.3 111 765.3
70 21.1 121 834.3
75 23.9 132 910.1
80 26.7 144 992.8
85 29.4 156 1075.6
90 32.2 168 1158.3
95 35.0 182 1254.8
100 37.8 196 1351.4
105 40.6 211 1454.8
110 43.3 226 1558.2
115 46.1 243 1675.4
120 48.9 260 1792.6
125 51.7 278 1916.7
130 54.4 297 2047.7
135 57.2 317 2185.6
140 60.0 337 2323.5
145 62.8 359 2475.2
150 65.6 382 2633.8

Conclusion

There you have it folks. I hope this article was helpful and if you find that something is inaccurate here in my chart please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I have sourced this the best I could but there is always going to be conflicting data.  I’ve seen it multiple times on various refrigerants. I’ll search for a refrigerant’s pressure chart and get various results all showing different pounds per square inch temperatures.

The aim with this article is to give you accurate information so again, if you see anything incorrect please let me know by contacting me here. On top of this post we are also working on a comprehensive refrigerant pressure/temperature listing. The goal is to have every refrigerant out there listed with a pressure/temperature chart that is easily available. 

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

Owner

RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-404A Pressure Chart

R-404A rose to prominence in the late 1990’s with the phasing out of CFC and HCFC refrigerants like R-12 and R-502. There had to be a replacement for the Ozone damaging refrigerants of the past and the successor was the HFC R-404A that we all know of today.

404A’s reign however was short lived. R-404A has one of the highest Global Warming Potential numbers of any modern day refrigerant and is known as a super pollutant. Because of this we are seeing various countries and manufacturers no longer using R-404A in new machinery. Instead, companies and countries are opting for more climate friendly refrigerants such as natural refrigerants, hydrocarbons, and newer less GWP heavy HFO refrigerants

If you would like to read more about R-404A  refrigerant please click here to be taken to our refrigerant fact sheet.

Let’s take a look at our pressure chart:

°F °C PSI KPA
-40 -40.0 4.3 29.6
-35 -37.2 6.8 46.9
-30 -34.4 9.5 65.5
-25 -31.7 12.5 86.2
-20 -28.9 15.7 108.2
-15 -26.1 19.3 133.1
-10 -23.3 23.2 160.0
-5 -20.6 27.5 189.6
0 -17.8 32.1 221.3
5 -15.0 37 255.1
10 -12.2 42.4 292.3
15 -9.4 48.2 332.3
20 -6.7 54.5 375.8
25 -3.9 61.2 422.0
30 -1.1 68.4 471.6
35 1.7 76.1 524.7
40 4.4 84.4 581.9
45 7.2 93.2 642.6
50 10.0 103 710.2
55 12.8 113 779.1
60 15.6 123 848.1
65 18.3 135 930.8
70 21.1 147 1013.5
75 23.9 159 1096.3
80 26.7 173 1192.8
85 29.4 187 1289.3
90 32.2 202 1392.7
95 35.0 218 1503.1
100 37.8 234 1613.4
105 40.6 252 1737.5
110 43.3 270 1861.6
115 46.1 289 1992.6
120 48.9 310 2137.4
125 51.7 331 2282.2
130 54.4 353 2433.9
135 57.2 377 2599.3
140 60.0 401 2764.8

 

Conclusion

There you have it folks. I hope this article was helpful and if you find that something is inaccurate here in my chart please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I have sourced this the best I could but there is always going to be conflicting data.  I’ve seen it multiple times on various refrigerants. I’ll search for a refrigerant’s pressure chart and get various results all showing different pounds per square inch temperatures.

The aim with this article is to give you accurate information so again, if you see anything incorrect please let me know by contacting me here. On top of this post we are also working on a comprehensive refrigerant pressure/temperature listing. The goal is to have every refrigerant out there listed with a pressure/temperature chart that is easily available. 

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

Owner