RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

R-513A XP10 Refrigerant Pressure PT Chart

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing a home air conditioner, refrigerator, a vehicle’s air conditioner, or a commercial cooler is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that the system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they are stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-513A XP10 Basic Info & PT Chart

R-513A is one of the newer refrigerants that falls under the Hydrofluoroolefins (HFO) refrigerant classifications. It also known under the Chemours Opteon brand name of XP10. It is an azeotropic blend consisting of R-1234yf (56%) and R-134a (44%). It also has zero temperature glide.

This refrigerant was designed as a replacement for R-134a in medium and high temperature applications. It closely matches the overall capacity and energy efficiency when compared to R-134a. It can be used in both newer applications or as a retrofit for older systems. The good news is that when performing retrofits you’ll find that R-513A is also compatible with most existing equipment design and oils of previous 134a systems. (R-513A uses POE oil) It is worth noting here that this refrigerant must be charged from the liquid phase to ensure that you get accurate composition during the charge.

As I had mentioned in the previous paragraph this was designed to be used in medium and high temperature applications. In most cases you’ll find that these applications are chillers and commercial refrigeration equipment including medium temperature commercial/industrial direct expansion refrigeration as well as hybrid cascade systems. It can also be found in water chillers, air conditioners, and heat pumps. Lastly, it can be used in centrifugal chillers, direct expansion chillers, and ice rink systems.

One of the defining factors as to why we should switch to this new HFO refrigerant is the savings in Global Warming Potential. Between the two refrigerants there is a fifty-six percent difference. R-134a has a GWP of one-thousand four-hundred and thirty while R-513A has a GWP of six-hundred and thirty-one. That is a big difference and will help your company become more environmentally friendly.

While there is a huge savings in GWP from switching over to this new refrigerant it is still worth mentioning that a GWP of six-hundred is still very high. What that means is that this R-513A refrigerant may not be around that long before it too gets phased down across the country due to a high GWP number. So, if you are in a pinch then you may consider this refrigerant but if it was me I would seriously look at natural refrigerants. Natural refrigerants will be around forever and they will not be phased down. Ultimately, the choice is up to you.

The last point to make on this R-513A refrigerant is rated as an A1 from ASHRAE. What that means is that the refrigerant is non-toxic and non-flammable. This is the exact same rating that R-134a has as well.

Alright folks, I’ve talked enough about this refrigerant. Lets get onto the pressure chart. In the table below you should find what you are looking for but if you do find that something is incorrect or if I am missing something please reach out to me and I will get it corrected as soon as possible. I strive to have this site as accurate as I can.

Temp (F)Temp (C)Liquid Pressure (PSIG)Vapor Pressure (PSIG)
-94-70-13.13-13.17
-90.4-68-12.91-12.95
-86.8-66-12.65-12.7
-83.2-64-12.37-12.42
-79.6-62-12.06-12.11
-76-60-11.71-11.77
-72.4-58-11.33-11.38
-68.8-56-10.91-10.96
-65.2-54-10.44-10.5
-61.6-52-9.93-9.99
-58-50-9.37-9.43
-54.4-48-8.76-8.82
-50.8-46-8.09-8.15
-47.2-44-7.36-7.43
-43.6-42-6.57-6.64
-40-40-5.71-5.78
-36.4-38-4.78-4.85
-32.8-36-3.78-3.85
-29.2-34-2.7-2.77
-25.6-32-1.53-1.6
-22-30-0.28-0.35
-18.4-281.071
-14.8-262.512.45
-11.2-244.063.99
-7.6-225.715.65
-4-207.487.42
-0.4-189.369.3
3.2-1611.3611.31
6.8-1413.4913.44
10.4-1215.7615.71
14-1018.1618.11
17.6-820.7120.66
21.2-623.423.36
24.8-426.2526.21
28.4-229.2629.22
32032.4432.41
35.6235.7935.76
39.2439.3239.29
42.8643.0343.01
46.4846.9446.92
501051.0451.02
53.61255.3555.33
57.21459.8759.85
60.81664.664.59
64.41869.5669.55
682074.7474.74
71.62280.1780.16
75.22485.8485.83
78.82691.7591.75
82.42897.9397.93
8630104.37104.37
89.632111.09111.09
93.234118.08118.08
96.836125.36125.36
100.438132.94132.93
10440140.82140.81
107.642149149
111.244157.51157.5
114.846166.36166.34
118.448175.52175.51
12250185.05185.02
125.652194.91194.88
129.254205.15205.1
132.856215.75215.7
136.458226.74226.68
14060238.1238.05
143.662249.89249.82
147.264262.07262
150.866274.69274.6
154.468287.74287.65
15870301.24301.14

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

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