RefrigerantHQ's Pressure Charts

R-22 Freon Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

One of the very first steps when it comes to diagnosing your home air conditioner, refrigerator, or even your vehicle’s air conditioner is understanding the temperature and the current pressure that your system is operating at. Having these facts along with the saturation point, the subcool, and the superheat  numbers for the refrigerant you are working on are essential when it comes to really understanding what is going wrong with your system.

After a visual inspection the very next step for the most seasoned technicians is pulling out their gauges and checking the pressure and temperature. It just becomes second nature after enough calls. I have heard stories of rookie techs calling some of the pros on their team for help on a system that they’re stuck on. It doesn’t matter what the situation is. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Miami or in Fargo. It will never fail that one of the first questions the pros ask the rookie is what is your subcool and what is your superheat? Having  and understanding these numbers is key to figuring out what to do next.

But, these numbers won’t do you any good if you don’t know what refrigerant you are dealing with and what the refrigerant’s boiling point is at each pressure level. This article aims at providing you with just that information.

R-22 Pressure Chart

R-22 refrigerant is the major refrigerant, or… it was. R-22 was invented by a partnership with General Motors and DuPont back in the 1930’s. In the 1950’s the use of R-22 exploded and for nearly sixty years it was THE refrigerant to be used in home, office, and commercial air conditioning. Along with air conditioning it was also used in chillers, ice rinks, and many other applications.

It was in the 1980’s that it was discovered that R-22 was damaging the Ozone layer with the chlorine that it contained. In order to correct this R-22 was phased out across the world. Here in America our phase out began in 2010 and the refrigerant will be completely phased out in 2020. Taking R-22’s place is the HFC refrigerant blend known as R-410A, our Puron.

As I write this article, in 2019, there are still thousands of R-22 machines out there, but they are a dying breed and within the next ten to twenty years R-22 will be as rare to find as R-12 is today.

If you would like to read more about R-22 Freon  refrigerant please click here to be taken to our refrigerant fact sheet.

Let’s take a look at our pressure chart:

°F °C PSI KPA
-40 -40.0 0.5 3.4
-35 -37.2 2.6 17.9
-30 -34.4 4.9 33.8
-25 -31.7 7.4 51.0
-20 -28.9 10.1 69.6
-15 -26.1 13.2 91.0
-10 -23.3 16.5 113.8
-5 -20.6 20.1 138.6
0 -17.8 24 165.5
5 -15.0 28.2 194.4
10 -12.2 32.8 226.1
15 -9.4 37.7 259.9
20 -6.7 43 296.5
25 -3.9 48.8 336.5
30 -1.1 54.9 378.5
35 1.7 61.5 424.0
40 4.4 68.5 472.3
45 7.2 76 524.0
50 10.0 84 579.2
55 12.8 92.6 638.5
60 15.6 102 703.3
65 18.3 111 765.3
70 21.1 121 834.3
75 23.9 132 910.1
80 26.7 144 992.8
85 29.4 156 1075.6
90 32.2 168 1158.3
95 35.0 182 1254.8
100 37.8 196 1351.4
105 40.6 211 1454.8
110 43.3 226 1558.2
115 46.1 243 1675.4
120 48.9 260 1792.6
125 51.7 278 1916.7
130 54.4 297 2047.7
135 57.2 317 2185.6
140 60.0 337 2323.5
145 62.8 359 2475.2
150 65.6 382 2633.8

Conclusion

There you have it folks. I hope this article was helpful and if you find that something is inaccurate here in my chart please do not hesitate to reach out to me. I have sourced this the best I could but there is always going to be conflicting data.  I’ve seen it multiple times on various refrigerants. I’ll search for a refrigerant’s pressure chart and get various results all showing different pounds per square inch temperatures.

The aim with this article is to give you accurate information so again, if you see anything incorrect please let me know by contacting me here. On top of this post we are also working on a comprehensive refrigerant pressure/temperature listing. The goal is to have every refrigerant out there listed with a pressure/temperature chart that is easily available. 

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ

Owner

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