Parasense

Top 5

Greetings ladies and gentlemen. Hope everyone is ready for the weekend. I certainty am after the week I had. I had every intention on working on another article over the course of the week but before I knew it Friday had arrived and the week was over. On top of that my Saturday and Sunday are completely booked with either yard work or family time. So, here I am on a Friday night just after ten o’clock working on an article.

Today’s post is a bit different then my others. Typically, when I do an article I like to write it myself and provide all of the details and sources myself as well. Over the course of this week I had a few contacts at Bacharach reach out to me. They had just completed a study on leak detection and they wanted to spread the word on what their study and what their findings were. If you are an avid reader of other HVAC or refrigerant news you may have already seen other websites such as CoolingPost.com do an article on this study.

A refrigerant leak is obviously never a good thing. If you’re a home owner it can mean an expensive repair bill to fix the leak and recharge your system. If you’re a business owner that expensive repair just increased ten fold. Now, imagine if you’re dealing with an industrial refrigeration system that has thousands of pounds of refrigerant in it. That bill just keeps going up and up. This is why it is so important to identify and catch refrigerant leaks before they get out of control. Typically, the quicker the problem is found the less money you will have to pay in repairs.

On top of refrigerant leaks being expensive they are also hugely detrimental to the environment. Obviously, it matters what kind of refrigerant you’re using in but more often then not the refrigerant leaking is either hurting the Ozone or is affecting Global Warming. refrigerant either. There was a story last month that involved a seafood company not correcting their leaking R-22 units. They were then fined by the Environmental Protection Agency for not following the Clean Air Act. Leaks are serious.

The problem though when dealing with refrigerant leaks is finding and identifying the leak. You need the right equipment and the right knowledge on how to find a leak but even in the best cases a leak can be difficult to find. In fact, there are instances where leaks can come and go making it that much more difficult to find. So, how can we improve this process? How can we help our customers before the leak gets out of control?

Bacharach

What Bacharach has done is they have recorded leak detection data from all over the world. Over three billion samples, yes three billion. That is a huge number and an amazing amount of data at their fingertips. The aim here is to aggregate all of this data and determine what exactly are the top five refrigerant leak types. I am a big fan of this type of thing as I am a data guy and love digging into the numbers and analyzing the results.

To show these results Bacharach has created a free webinar for anyone to watch. All you need to do is fill out a simple form of name, e-mail, phone and then the webinar pops right up. The video is twenty-five minutes but it contains a lot of great information. It is narrated by Jason Ayres, a veteran at the Bacharach company with over twenty years of experience.

It’s easy to see after just a few minutes of watching the video that these guys know what they’re talking about. If you’d like to watch the video then please click here to be taken to Bacharach’s website. Again, you’ll have to fill out a short form but it only took me a few seconds.

Conclusion

Just so you all know, I was not compensated for this post. I did enjoy a nice dinner with the Bacharach guys here in Kansas City, but that was more of a meet and greet then anything else. We enjoyed some of that famous Kansas City barbecue! I watched this leak detection video myself and thought that it was a great resources for those of you within the industry. Check it out if you’ve got some time over the weekend or if you’ve got a slow day at the office!

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

RefrigerantHQ